The night skies are set to be lit up by a fireball meteor shower.

The Perseid meteor shower, described by Nasa as “one of the best meteor showers of the year”, was due on Tuesday evening and early Wednesday morning.

Peak viewing time would from around midnight until 5am, but a full moon would limit how many meteors would be visible. Nasa predicted rates would diminish from 60 meteors per hour to between 15 and 20 per hour.

Did you see the meteor shower? Send your photos and videos through to newstips@stuff.co.nz.

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A meteorite of the swarm of meteorites Perseida illuminate at the sky above Salgotarjan, Hungary, early Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019. The Perseid meteor shower occurs every year in August when the Earth passes through debris and dust of the Swift-Tuttle comet.

Peter Komka/MTI via AP

A meteorite of the swarm of meteorites Perseida illuminate at the sky above Salgotarjan, Hungary, early Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019. The Perseid meteor shower occurs every year in August when the Earth passes through debris and dust of the Swift-Tuttle comet.

The shower would actually be visible earlier, from 9pm, but “you won’t see nearly as many as you would had you gone out during the early morning hours”, Nasa explained.

The meteors and fireballs were caused by debris from the Comet Swift-Tuttle and it began lighting up the skies in July, but Nasa said it was now peaking.

So how can you view it?

It would be visible with the naked eye, so no special equipment was necessary. However, it would be best for viewers to travel away from bright lights.

“Meteors can generally be seen all over the sky so don’t worry about looking in any particular direction.”

Stardome Observatory Planetarium advised on their website stargazers should “watch out for bright shoots of light ‘radiating’ from a centre low on the horizon”.

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